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What is Solid State Lighting (SSL)?

Solid State lighting uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), or polymer light-emitting diodes (PLED) as sources of illumination rather LED lightthan electrical filaments (used in incandescent lamps), plasma (used in florescent lamps) or gas.  


What Makes LEDs Different From Other Light Sources?

LEDs are semiconductor devices, while incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are all based on glass enclosures containing a filament or electrodes with fill gases and coatings of various types.

LED lighting starts with a tiny chip (most commonly about 1 mm2) comprising layers of semi-conducting material. LED packages may contain just one chip or multiple chips, mounted on heat-conducting material and usually enclosed in a lens or encapsulant. The resulting device, typically around 7 to 9 mm on a side, can produce 30 to 150 lumens each, and can be used separately or in arrays. LED devices are mounted on a circuit board and attached to a lighting fixture, architectural structure, or even a "light bulb" package.


How Does It Work?

LEDs differ from traditional light sources in the way they produce light. In an incandescent lamp, a tungsten filament is heated by electric current until it glows or emits light. In a fluorescent lamp, an electric arc excites mercury atoms, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. After striking the phosphor coating on the inside of glass tubes, the UV radiation is converted and emitted as visible light.
An LED, in contrast, is a semiconductor diode. It consists of a chip of semiconducting material treated to create a structure called a p-n (positive-negative) junction. When connected to a power source, current flows from the p-side or anode to the n-side, or cathode, but not in the reverse direction. How it worksCharge-carriers (electrons and electron holes) flow into the junction from electrodes. When an electron meets a hole, it falls into a lower energy level, and releases energy in the form of a photon (light).

The specific wavelength or color emitted by the LED depends on the materials used to make the diode.  Red LEDs are based on aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs). Blue LEDs are made from indium gallium nitride (InGaN) and green from aluminum gallium phosphide (AlGaP). "White" light is created by combining the light from red, green, and blue (RGB) LEDs or by coating a blue LED with yellow phosphor.   

 

What are the Benefits of LEDs?


Benefits: 

  • Energy Conservation of over 50% (depends on lamp style)
  • Immediate and continual financial savings 
  • Long-term reduction in maintenance labor related to lighting due to the longer service lives of replacement products    
  • Long term reduction in cost of bulbs
  • Significant and immediate reduction in the cost of related air-conditioning expenses
  • Long term reduction in cost of disposal of fluorescent bulbs in accordance with EPA  regulations
  • Increase the value of your business asset
  • Reduction of fire insurance premiums


Are there any Federal Tax Incentives available?

Yes, a general overview of the EPACT Tax Deduction is as follows:

The Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction is Section 1331 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005. The Commercial Buildings Deduction, advocated by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), is a special financial incentive for building owners to adopt the most energy-efficient lighting strategies.

The Deduction provides up to the entire cost of energy-efficient interior lighting to be deducted on the owner’s taxes in the year the lighting is placed in service, capped at $0.60/sq.ft., if the new lighting’s power use reduces lighting power density below the maximum allowable lighting power densities listed in ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2001, and if other requirements are met. Alternatively, a building could achieve a target level of savings for HVAC/hot water and building envelope in addition to lighting, and benefit from deducting the entire cost of all energy-saving upgrades capped at $1.80/sq.ft.

For more information go to www.lightingtaxdeduction.org


Are there any Rebate Incentives available?

Yes, most utility companies offer rebates for using energy efficient lighting technologies. However, each utility has different criteria for qualification. Contact GonLED for additional information.

 

What is Solid State Lighting (SSL)?

Solid State lighting uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), or polymer light-emitting diodes (PLED) as sources of illumination rather than electrical filaments (used in incandescent lamps), plasma (used in florescent lamps) or gas.


What Makes LEDs Different From Other Light Sources?

LEDs are semiconductor devices, while incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are all based on glass enclosures containing a filament or electrodes with fill gases and coatings of various types.

LED lighting starts with a tiny chip (most commonly about 1 mm2) comprising layers of semi-conducting material. LED packages may contain just one chip or multiple chips, mounted on heat-conducting material and usually enclosed in a lens or encapsulant. The resulting device, typically around 7 to 9 mm on a side, can produce 30 to 150 lumens each, and can be used separately or in arrays. LED devices are mounted on a circuit board and attached to a lighting fixture, architectural structure, or even a "light bulb" package.

How Does It Work?
LEDs differ from traditional light sources in the way they produce light. In an incandescent lamp, a tungsten filament is heated by electric current until it glows or emits light. In a fluorescent lamp, an electric arc excites mercury atoms, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. After striking the phosphor coating on the inside of glass tubes, the UV radiation is converted and emitted as visible light.

An LED, in contrast, is a semiconductor diode. It consists of a chip of semiconducting material treated to create a structure called a p-n (positive-negative) junction. When connected to a power source, current flows from the p-side or anode to the n-side, or cathode, but not in the re verse direction. Charge-carriers (electrons and electron holes) flow into the junction from electrodes. When an electron meets a hole, it falls into a lower energy level, and releases energy in the form of a photon (light).

The specific wavelength or color emitted by the LED depends on the materials used to make the diode.

Red LEDs are based on aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs). Blue LEDs are made from indium gallium nitride (InGaN) and green from aluminum gallium phosphide (AlGaP). "White" light is created by combining the light from red, green, and blue (RGB) LEDs or by coating a blue LED with yellow phosphor.

What are the Benefits of LEDs?

Benefits: 

Ø  Energy Conservation of over 50% (depends on lamp style)

Ø  Immediate and continual financial savings

Ø  Long-term reduction in maintenance labor related to lighting due to the longer service lives of replacement products   

Ø  Long term reduction in cost of bulbs

Ø  Significant and immediate reduction in the cost of related air-conditioning expenses

Ø  Long term reduction in cost of disposal of fluorescent bulbs in accordance with EPA  regulations

Ø  Increase the value of your business asset

Ø  Reduction of fire insurance premiums


Are there any Federal Tax Incentives available?

YES, a general overview of the EPACT Tax Deduction is as follows:

The Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction is Section 1331 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005. The Commercial Buildings Deduction, advocated by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), is a special financial incentive for building owners to adopt the most energy-efficient lighting strategies.

The Deduction provides up to the entire cost of energy-efficient interior lighting to be deducted on the owner’s taxes in the year the lighting is placed in service, capped at $0.60/sq.ft., if the new lighting’s power use reduces lighting power density below the maximum allowable lighting power densities listed in ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2001, and if other requirements are met. Alternatively, a building could achieve a target level of savings for HVAC/hot water and building envelope in addition to lighting, and benefit from deducting the entire cost of all energy-saving upgrades capped at $1.80/sq.ft.

For more information go to http://www.lightingtaxdeduction.org/ 

Are there any Rebate Incentives available?

Yes, most utility companies offer rebates for using energy efficient lighting technologies. However, each utility has different criteria for qualification. Contact GonLED for additional information.

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